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VHS Standard

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'''''This article is a stub. You can help the GHN by expanding it.'''''  
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<p>'''''This article is a stub. You can help the GHN by expanding it.''''' </p>
  
On 9 September 1976, the [[Milestones:Development of VHS, a World Standard for Home Video Recording, 1976|first VHS model videotape recorder]] was announced. The standard had been developed at the Yokohama Plant of Victor Company of Japan, Limited, by a team of engineers headed by Shizuo Takano and Yuma Shiraishi. VHS became the world standard for home video tape recorders.
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<p>[[Image:Development of VHS.jpg|thumb|right|Development of VHS]] </p>
  
[[Category:Signals]] [[Category:Signal_generation_&_recording|Category:Signal_generation_&amp;_recording]] [[Category:Magnetic_recording]]
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<p>On 9 September 1976, the [[Milestones:Development of VHS, a World Standard for Home Video Recording, 1976|first VHS model videotape recorder]] was announced by Victor Company of Japan. The HR-3300, weighing 30 pounds, was smaller and lighter than other equivalent VTRs. The standard had been developed at the Yokohama Plant of Victor Company of Japan, Limited, by a team of engineers headed by Shizuo Takano and Yuma Shiraishi. The basic design, with subsequent improvement, gained wide customer acceptance and became the world standard. </p>
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[[Category:Signals]]
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[[Category:Signal_generation_&_recording]]
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[[Category:Magnetic_recording]]

Latest revision as of 16:40, 2 March 2012

This article is a stub. You can help the GHN by expanding it.

Development of VHS
Development of VHS

On 9 September 1976, the first VHS model videotape recorder was announced by Victor Company of Japan. The HR-3300, weighing 30 pounds, was smaller and lighter than other equivalent VTRs. The standard had been developed at the Yokohama Plant of Victor Company of Japan, Limited, by a team of engineers headed by Shizuo Takano and Yuma Shiraishi. The basic design, with subsequent improvement, gained wide customer acceptance and became the world standard.