IEEE

Schuyler Wheeler

SHARE |

From GHN

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
 
== Schuyler Skaats Wheeler: Biography  ==
 
== Schuyler Skaats Wheeler: Biography  ==
  
Born: 1859/1860?<br>Died: 20 April 1923
+
Born: 1859/1860?<br>Died: 20 April 1923  
  
<br>Schuyler Skaats Wheeler was born in New York City. He graduated from Columbia University in 1881. After graduating, he worked as an electrician for Jablochkoff Electric Light Company and then the United States Electric Company. In 1883, he began working with Thomas Edison. He opened a number of electric light stations and supervised an Edison plant in Newburgh, New York. Wheeler then also briefly worked with C &amp; C Motor Company, the first manufacturers of small electric motors.
+
<br>Schuyler Skaats Wheeler was born in New York City. He graduated from Columbia University in 1881. After graduating, he worked as an electrician for Jablochkoff Electric Light Company and then the United States Electric Company. In 1883, he began working with [[Thomas_Alva_Edison|Thomas Edison]]. He opened a number of electric light stations and supervised an Edison plant in Newburgh, New York. Wheeler then also briefly worked with C &amp; C Motor Company, the first manufacturers of small electric motors.  
  
<br>After working with this variety of leading companies, Wheeler helped form the Crocker-Wheeler Company in 1888, of which he was president. The company survived a fire at its plant in 1895 by moving its manufacturing to large tents while a new factory was constructed. Wheeler designed a number of electric drives and motors, including some which were used in government printing offices and Washington D.C. elevators.
+
<br>After working with this variety of leading companies, Wheeler helped form the Crocker-Wheeler Company in 1888, of which he was president. The company survived a fire at its plant in 1895 by moving its manufacturing to large tents while a new factory was constructed. Wheeler designed a number of electric drives and motors, including some which were used in government printing offices and Washington D.C. elevators.  
  
<br>Wheeler served his community of colleagues.&nbsp;Along with eight others, he&nbsp;was one of the founders of the United Engineering Society. He purchased a significant collection of rare electrical books and donated them to the AIEE. He was [[Presidents_of_the_American_Institute_of_Electrical_Engineers_(AIEE)|AIEE president]] from 1905 to 1906.&nbsp;Wheeler was also a member of several other engineering organizations and the author of a number of articles. He died on 20 April 1923.
+
<br>Wheeler served his community of colleagues.&nbsp;Along with eight others, he&nbsp;was one of the founders of the United Engineering Society. He purchased a significant collection of rare electrical books and donated them to the AIEE. He was [[Presidents of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE)|AIEE president]] from 1905 to 1906.&nbsp;Wheeler was also a member of several other engineering organizations and the author of a number of articles. He died on 20 April 1923.  
  
 +
<br>
  
 
+
'''See also:<br>'''[[Papers of Schuyler Skaats Wheeler|Papers of Schuyler Skaats Wheeler]]  
'''See also:<br>'''[[Papers_of_Schuyler_Skaats_Wheeler|Papers of Schuyler Skaats Wheeler]]
+
  
 
<br>
 
<br>

Revision as of 17:13, 19 June 2009

Schuyler Skaats Wheeler: Biography

Born: 1859/1860?
Died: 20 April 1923


Schuyler Skaats Wheeler was born in New York City. He graduated from Columbia University in 1881. After graduating, he worked as an electrician for Jablochkoff Electric Light Company and then the United States Electric Company. In 1883, he began working with Thomas Edison. He opened a number of electric light stations and supervised an Edison plant in Newburgh, New York. Wheeler then also briefly worked with C & C Motor Company, the first manufacturers of small electric motors.


After working with this variety of leading companies, Wheeler helped form the Crocker-Wheeler Company in 1888, of which he was president. The company survived a fire at its plant in 1895 by moving its manufacturing to large tents while a new factory was constructed. Wheeler designed a number of electric drives and motors, including some which were used in government printing offices and Washington D.C. elevators.


Wheeler served his community of colleagues. Along with eight others, he was one of the founders of the United Engineering Society. He purchased a significant collection of rare electrical books and donated them to the AIEE. He was AIEE president from 1905 to 1906. Wheeler was also a member of several other engineering organizations and the author of a number of articles. He died on 20 April 1923.


See also:
Papers of Schuyler Skaats Wheeler



Would you like to help us? Use the edit tab to contribute to this article.