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Oral-History:Eugene O'Neill

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(New page: == About Eugene O'Neill<br> == O’Neill received his bachelors in engineering in 1940 and his masters of electrical engineering in 1941, both from Columbia University. He then worked at ...)
 
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O’Neill received his bachelors in engineering in 1940 and his masters of electrical engineering in 1941, both from Columbia University. He then worked at Bell Labs for the rest of his career. During World War II he worked on airborne radar systems. After the war he worked on the L-3 coaxial system until the early 1950s. He then worked on microwave radio systems; transoceanic submarine cables in the mid 1950s the time-assignment speech interpolation termina system (TASI) in the late 1950s, which increased capacity by using high-speed switching to use a channel only when a person is talking; and the Telstar project, an early communications satellite, in the early 1960s. Then as executive director in charge of all long-distance transmission systems, he developed the production version of short-haul digital transmission in metropolitan areas. He also developed the L-4 and L-5 coaxial systems, and the single sideband system. He is most satisfied with his work on TASI, followed by his work on metropolitan digital terminals. Telstar was nice, but he was too busy administering, too far from the actual research, to feel as much satisfaction about that.
 
O’Neill received his bachelors in engineering in 1940 and his masters of electrical engineering in 1941, both from Columbia University. He then worked at Bell Labs for the rest of his career. During World War II he worked on airborne radar systems. After the war he worked on the L-3 coaxial system until the early 1950s. He then worked on microwave radio systems; transoceanic submarine cables in the mid 1950s the time-assignment speech interpolation termina system (TASI) in the late 1950s, which increased capacity by using high-speed switching to use a channel only when a person is talking; and the Telstar project, an early communications satellite, in the early 1960s. Then as executive director in charge of all long-distance transmission systems, he developed the production version of short-haul digital transmission in metropolitan areas. He also developed the L-4 and L-5 coaxial systems, and the single sideband system. He is most satisfied with his work on TASI, followed by his work on metropolitan digital terminals. Telstar was nice, but he was too busy administering, too far from the actual research, to feel as much satisfaction about that.
  
== About the Interview<br> ==
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== About the Interview<br> ==
  
EUGENE O’NEILL: An Interview Conducted by David Hochfelder,&nbsp; IEEE History Center, 9 July 2001
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EUGENE O’NEILL: An Interview Conducted by David Hochfelder,&nbsp; IEEE History Center, 9 July 2001  
  
Interview # 415 for the IEEE History Center, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
 
  
  
  
  
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Interview # 415 for the IEEE History Center, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  
 
== <br>Copyright Statement ==
 
== <br>Copyright Statement ==

Revision as of 17:38, 4 November 2008

Contents

About Eugene O'Neill

O’Neill received his bachelors in engineering in 1940 and his masters of electrical engineering in 1941, both from Columbia University. He then worked at Bell Labs for the rest of his career. During World War II he worked on airborne radar systems. After the war he worked on the L-3 coaxial system until the early 1950s. He then worked on microwave radio systems; transoceanic submarine cables in the mid 1950s the time-assignment speech interpolation termina system (TASI) in the late 1950s, which increased capacity by using high-speed switching to use a channel only when a person is talking; and the Telstar project, an early communications satellite, in the early 1960s. Then as executive director in charge of all long-distance transmission systems, he developed the production version of short-haul digital transmission in metropolitan areas. He also developed the L-4 and L-5 coaxial systems, and the single sideband system. He is most satisfied with his work on TASI, followed by his work on metropolitan digital terminals. Telstar was nice, but he was too busy administering, too far from the actual research, to feel as much satisfaction about that.

About the Interview

EUGENE O’NEILL: An Interview Conducted by David Hochfelder,  IEEE History Center, 9 July 2001



Interview # 415 for the IEEE History Center, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey


Copyright Statement

This manuscript is being made available for research purposes only. All literary rights in the manuscript, including the right to publish, are reserved to the IEEE History Center. No part of the manuscript may be quoted for publication without the written permission of the Director of IEEE History Center.


Request for permission to quote for publication should be addressed to the IEEE History Center Oral History Program, Rutgers - the State University, 39 Union Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8538 USA. It should include identification of the specific passages to be quoted, anticipated use of the passages, and identification of the user.
It is recommended that this oral history be cited as follows:


Eugene O’Neill, an oral history conducted in 2001 by David Hochfelder, IEEE History Center, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.

Interview

Interview: Eugene O’Neill
Interviewer: David Hochfelder
Date: 9 July 2001
Place: Middletown, New Jersey