IEEE

Nollet Electrifies Royal Guard

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'''This article is a stub. Please help expand the article by using the edit tab.''' [[Image:Leyden jar.jpg|thumb|center|Leyden Jar]] In April 1746, Abbé Nollet transmitted the charge of a [[Leyden jar|Leyden jar]] through a chain of 180 Royal Guards in Paris. Soon afterwards he performed a grander experiment at a Carthusian convent, making a 5,400-foot circle monks all give "a sudden spring" simultaneously.
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'''This article is a stub. Please help expand the article by using the edit tab.''' [[Image:Leyden jar.jpg|thumb|center|Leyden Jar]] In April 1746, Abbé Nollet transmitted the charge of a [[Leyden jar|Leyden jar]] through a chain of 180 Royal Guards in Paris. Soon afterwards he performed a grander experiment at a Carthusian convent, making a 5,400-foot circle monks all give "a sudden spring" simultaneously.  
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[[Category:Power,_energy_&_industry_application|Category:Power,_energy_&_industry_application]] [[Category:Electrochemical_devices_&_processes|Category:Electrochemical_devices_&_processes]] [[Category:Batteries]]

Revision as of 17:32, 16 December 2009

This article is a stub. Please help expand the article by using the edit tab.
Leyden Jar
Leyden Jar
In April 1746, Abbé Nollet transmitted the charge of a Leyden jar through a chain of 180 Royal Guards in Paris. Soon afterwards he performed a grander experiment at a Carthusian convent, making a 5,400-foot circle monks all give "a sudden spring" simultaneously.