IEEE

Kenneth Laker

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Kenneth R. Laker received the B.E. degree in electrical engineering from Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY, in 1968 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from New York University in 1970 and 1973, respectively.  
 
Kenneth R. Laker received the B.E. degree in electrical engineering from Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY, in 1968 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from New York University in 1970 and 1973, respectively.  
 
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He was a member of the founding Board of Directors of AANetcom, Allentown, PA, until its sale to PMC-Sierra in 2000.<br>Currently, he is a professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He was&nbsp;cofounder, President, and CEO of DFT MicroSystems. His work in microelectronic filters has contributed four textbooks, more than 90 scientific articles, and six patents.  
 
He was a member of the founding Board of Directors of AANetcom, Allentown, PA, until its sale to PMC-Sierra in 2000.<br>Currently, he is a professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He was&nbsp;cofounder, President, and CEO of DFT MicroSystems. His work in microelectronic filters has contributed four textbooks, more than 90 scientific articles, and six patents.  
  
<br>The awards he has received include the 1994 AT&amp;T Clinton Davisson Trophy for his patent in switched capacitor circuits and the 1998 IEEE Circuits and Systems Darlington Award for the paper “Integrated Circuit Testing for Quality Assurance in Manufacturing: History, Current Status, and Future Trends,” which was published in IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems—II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing (August 1997).  
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The awards he has received include the 1994 AT&amp;T Clinton Davisson Trophy for his patent in switched capacitor circuits and the 1998 IEEE Circuits and Systems Darlington Award for the paper “Integrated Circuit Testing for Quality Assurance in Manufacturing: History, Current Status, and Future Trends,” which was published in IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems—II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing (August 1997).  
 
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He has served the IEEE in numerous leadership positions, including [[Presidents of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)|IEEE President]] in 1999, and as Chair of the Foundation’s Trustees of the IEEE History Center.  
 
He has served the IEEE in numerous leadership positions, including [[Presidents of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)|IEEE President]] in 1999, and as Chair of the Foundation’s Trustees of the IEEE History Center.  
  
 
[[Category:People_and_organizations]] [[Category:Engineers]]
 
[[Category:People_and_organizations]] [[Category:Engineers]]

Revision as of 14:23, 8 September 2009

Kenneth Laker: Biography

Kenneth R. Laker received the B.E. degree in electrical engineering from Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY, in 1968 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from New York University in 1970 and 1973, respectively.

He was a member of the founding Board of Directors of AANetcom, Allentown, PA, until its sale to PMC-Sierra in 2000.
Currently, he is a professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He was cofounder, President, and CEO of DFT MicroSystems. His work in microelectronic filters has contributed four textbooks, more than 90 scientific articles, and six patents.

The awards he has received include the 1994 AT&T Clinton Davisson Trophy for his patent in switched capacitor circuits and the 1998 IEEE Circuits and Systems Darlington Award for the paper “Integrated Circuit Testing for Quality Assurance in Manufacturing: History, Current Status, and Future Trends,” which was published in IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems—II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing (August 1997).

He has served the IEEE in numerous leadership positions, including IEEE President in 1999, and as Chair of the Foundation’s Trustees of the IEEE History Center.