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James W. Weidenman

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Biography

James W. Weidenman was an electrical engineer and business executive who helped design one of the first electronic accounting machines.

Weidenman was born and raised in Spring Valley, New York, and earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at the Cooper Union and a master's degree in business at Hofstra University. During World War II, he served as a junior lieutenant on a mine sweeper in the Pacific Ocean.

In the early 1950s, he was a project manager at Potter Instrument Company in Great Neck, New York, where he led the development of one of the first electronic accounting machines and electronic garment tag readers.

In 1954, he left Potter for Litton Industries, where he worked for twenty-one years, advancing to executive leadership position in a number of its subsidiary firms. During his semi-retirement, between 1975 and 1990, he operated as an independent engineering consultant to domestic and international firms. In the 1990s, he worked for the New York City Housing Authority as an electrical engineer in its design department.

Further Reading

Tomomi Tanaami, "James W. Weidenman, 77, Former Executive," Newsday, 19 Mar 1998.