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US Rails Adopt Standard Time

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(New page: '''This article is a stub. Please help expand the article by using the edit tab.''' At noon on Sunday 18 November 1883 ("the day of two noons"), U.S. railroads converted to standard time...)
 
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'''This article is a stub. Please help expand the article by using the edit tab.'''  
 
'''This article is a stub. Please help expand the article by using the edit tab.'''  
  
At noon on Sunday 18 November 1883 ("the day of two noons"), U.S. railroads converted to standard time. Although railroads had no legal authority to govern time, towns and citizens across the nation synchronized their clocks to the four new time zones, which became federal law on 19 March 1918.
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At noon on Sunday 18 November 1883 ("the day of two noons"), U.S. railroads converted to standard time. Although railroads had no legal authority to govern time, towns and citizens across the nation synchronized their clocks to the four new time zones, which became federal law on 19 March 1918.  
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[[Category:Transportation]] [[Category:Land_transportation]] [[Category:Rail_transportation]] [[Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&_systems|Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&_systems]] [[Category:Measurement]] [[Category:Time_measurement]]

Revision as of 20:10, 16 December 2009

This article is a stub. Please help expand the article by using the edit tab.

At noon on Sunday 18 November 1883 ("the day of two noons"), U.S. railroads converted to standard time. Although railroads had no legal authority to govern time, towns and citizens across the nation synchronized their clocks to the four new time zones, which became federal law on 19 March 1918.