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Thread:Milestone-Proposal talk:Sharp 14-inch thin-film-transistor liquid-crystal display (TFT-LCD) for TV, which has ushered in TFT LCD industry/my findings

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1. The proposer must be aware of the existing  IEEE Milestone for Display, 1968 
Princeton, NJ, U.S.A., dedicated on 30 September 2006. The proposal duplicates or distract from our approved milestone.
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1. The proposer must be aware of the existing  IEEE Milestone for Liquid Crystal Display (RCA)  1968 
Princeton, NJ, U.S.A., dedicated on 30 September 2006. This proposal just doesn't look right: it duplicates, overlaps with, and spoils it for the IEEE Milestone already awarded for work by RCA.
  
Somewhere in the Wall Street Journal,   George Heilmeier gives credit to Sharp's great works when he says “I think you need to give the credit to the people who persevered and worked on LCDs for 25 years. I don’t spend too much time wringing my hands about it, but I have a lot of satisfaction knowing we had the same vision in the 1960s.”  George Harry Heilmeier is an American engineer who was a pioneering contributor to displays and is credited with the  of LC-Display. Now George may not want to spend time on this, but the IEEE History Center and the proposer must both find time to mesh these great works properly.
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Somewhere in the Wall Street Journal, I read that  George Heilmeier gave credit to Sharp's great works by saying “I think you need to give the credit to the people who persevered and worked on LCDs for 25 years. I don’t spend too much time wringing my hands about it, but I have a lot of satisfaction knowing we had the same vision in the 1960s.”  George Harry Heilmeier is an American engineer, a pioneering contributor to displays and is credited with the  of LC-Display. Now George may not be able to spend time on this, but this proposer and  members of the IEEE History Committee have work to do, trying to mesh these great work together.  
  
2. Plaque Location: No IEEE plaque  should be mounted in a private collection or museum behind closed doors that required the public to  make an appointment. Mount the plaque outdoors or in the lobby.
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2. Plaque Location: No IEEE plaque  should be mounted in a private collection or in a company museum behind closed doors that requires the public to  make an appointment. Mount the plaque outdoors or in the lobby.
  
3. The writeup says that Sharp has 'milestones' in their collection and that the world’s first mini calculator resides somewhere at the British Science Museum in London. For the sake of this proposal removed this company advertising.
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3. The writeup says that Sharp has 'milestones' in their company collection and that the world’s first mini calculator resides somewhere at the British Science Museum in London. All this corporate advertising should be removed from GHN records.

Latest revision as of 21:24, 16 July 2013

1. The proposer must be aware of the existing IEEE Milestone for Liquid Crystal Display (RCA) 1968 
Princeton, NJ, U.S.A., dedicated on 30 September 2006. This proposal just doesn't look right: it duplicates, overlaps with, and spoils it for the IEEE Milestone already awarded for work by RCA.

Somewhere in the Wall Street Journal, I read that George Heilmeier gave credit to Sharp's great works by saying “I think you need to give the credit to the people who persevered and worked on LCDs for 25 years. I don’t spend too much time wringing my hands about it, but I have a lot of satisfaction knowing we had the same vision in the 1960s.” George Harry Heilmeier is an American engineer, a pioneering contributor to displays and is credited with the of LC-Display. Now George may not be able to spend time on this, but this proposer and members of the IEEE History Committee have work to do, trying to mesh these great work together.

2. Plaque Location: No IEEE plaque should be mounted in a private collection or in a company museum behind closed doors that requires the public to make an appointment. Mount the plaque outdoors or in the lobby.

3. The writeup says that Sharp has 'milestones' in their company collection and that the world’s first mini calculator resides somewhere at the British Science Museum in London. All this corporate advertising should be removed from GHN records.