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STARS:Underwater Cables

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{{STARSArticle|citation=|timeline={{STARSTimeline|year1=|event1=|year2=|event2=|year3=|event3=|year4=|event4=|year5=|event5=}}|essay=|bibliography={{STARSBibliography|Pauthor1=|Pyear1=|Ptitle1=|Ppublisher1=|Pauthor2=|Pyear2=|Ptitle2=|Ppublisher2=|Pauthor3=|Pyear3=|Ptitle3=|Ppublisher3=|Pauthor4=|Pyear4=|Ptitle4=|Ppublisher4=|Pauthor5=|Pyear5=|Ptitle5=|Ppublisher5=|Sauthor1=|Syear1=|Stitle1=|Spublisher1=|Sauthor2=|Syear2=|Stitle2=|Spublisher2=|Sauthor3=|Syear3=|Stitle3=|Spublisher3=|Sauthor4=|Syear4=|Stitle4=|Spublisher4=|Sauthor5=|Syear5=|Stitle5=|Spublisher5=}}|resume=|complete=}}[[Category:STARS-Communications]]
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{{STARSArticle|citation=Communications cables under the seas have played a pivotal role in binding the world together—economically, politically and culturally—in ways that have been both beneficial and detrimental (or, one might say, stabilizing and destabilizing). Technical developments have taken the cables through three distinct eras: telegraphy with single-conductor copper wires, beginning in the 1850s; telephony by means of coaxial cables with repeaters, beginning in the 1950s; and data transmission through optical fibers, beginning in the 1980s.|timeline={{STARSTimeline|year1=|event1=|year2=|event2=|year3=|event3=|year4=|event4=|year5=|event5=}}|essay=|bibliography={{STARSBibliography|Pauthor1=|Pyear1=|Ptitle1=|Ppublisher1=|Pauthor2=|Pyear2=|Ptitle2=|Ppublisher2=|Pauthor3=|Pyear3=|Ptitle3=|Ppublisher3=|Pauthor4=|Pyear4=|Ptitle4=|Ppublisher4=|Pauthor5=|Pyear5=|Ptitle5=|Ppublisher5=|Sauthor1=|Syear1=|Stitle1=|Spublisher1=|Sauthor2=|Syear2=|Stitle2=|Spublisher2=|Sauthor3=|Syear3=|Stitle3=|Spublisher3=|Sauthor4=|Syear4=|Stitle4=|Spublisher4=|Sauthor5=|Syear5=|Stitle5=|Spublisher5=}}|resume=|complete=}}[[Category:]]

Revision as of 18:47, 18 January 2010

Author: Bernard Finn

Citation

Communications cables under the seas have played a pivotal role in binding the world together—economically, politically and culturally—in ways that have been both beneficial and detrimental (or, one might say, stabilizing and destabilizing). Technical developments have taken the cables through three distinct eras: telegraphy with single-conductor copper wires, beginning in the 1850s; telephony by means of coaxial cables with repeaters, beginning in the 1950s; and data transmission through optical fibers, beginning in the 1980s.

Timeline

Essay

Bibliography

References of Historical Significance


References for Further Reading


About the Author(s)

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