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Robert G. Meyer

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Biography

For more than 30 years, Robert G. Meyer has made the complicated aspects of electrical engineering interesting to students. Colleagues have referred to his lectures as “polished gems,” and he has supervised more than 20 doctoral students and more than 60 masters students that form a notable group of today’s leading radio frequency integrated circuit designers. Many of the top analog bipolar IC designers have also studied with Professor Meyer.

A member of the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley’s department of electrical engineering and computer sciences since 1968, Professor Meyer is known worldwide for the distinction of his graduate students and for his text co-written with Paul R. Gray, Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, in its fourth edition. Today, he is the UC Berkeley’s National Semiconductor Distinguished Professor.

Professor Meyer’s classes are in high demand; Advanced Integrated Circuits for Communications, a graduate class that he developed, regularly attracts about twice the average enrollment for advanced graduate classes. He created an original reader for the class, which includes topics like cross-modulation and intermodulation in high frequency integrated circuits.

Robert G. Meyer was born on July 21, 1942, in Melbourne, Australia. He received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering with first class honors in 1963, his master’s degree in engineering science with honors in 1965, and his doctoral degree in 1968, all from the University of Melbourne, Australia.

A Fellow of the IEEE, Professor Meyer has served the Institute in a number of ways, including as president of the Solid-State Circuits Council of the IEEE and a member of the Editorial Board of the IEEE Press. He has earned many awards and honors, including the J.J. Thomson Premium from the Institution of Electrical Engineers for research on noise in transistor mixers. In 1975, he was a visiting professor in the electrical engineering department of the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, and in 1996, he was a visiting professor in the electrical engineering department of Columbia University, New York.