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Robert E. McIntosh

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== Robert E. McIntosh ==
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== Robert E. McIntosh ==
  
Robert E. McIntosh was a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Massachusetts and an IEEE Life Fellow.
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Robert E. McIntosh was a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Massachusetts and an IEEE Life Fellow.  
  
McIntosh was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1940 and received a B.S. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, a master’s degree from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Iowa.
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McIntosh was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1940 and received a B.S. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, a master’s degree from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Iowa.  
  
In addition to his thirty-one year teaching career at UMass, he played a prominent leadership role in two IEEE societies: the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and the Antennas and Propagation Society. He also made numerous contributions to the study of microwave technology, particular its uses for the remote sensing of the environment. His [http://mirsl.ecs.umass.edu/?q=node/65 laboratory] created techniques for understanding complicated geological processes, from the movement of waves to the strength of the wind. He helped to create the Microwave and Electronics Group at the University of Massachusetts’ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and supervised hundreds of students and twenty dissertations.
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In addition to his thirty-one year teaching career at UMass, he played a prominent leadership role in two IEEE societies: the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and the Antennas and Propagation Society. He also made numerous contributions to the study of microwave technology, particular its uses for the remote sensing of the environment. His [http://mirsl.ecs.umass.edu/?q=node/65 laboratory] created techniques for understanding complicated geological processes, from the movement of waves to the strength of the wind. He helped to create the Microwave and Electronics Group at the University of Massachusetts’ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and supervised hundreds of students and twenty dissertations.  
  
Further Reading:
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Further Reading:  
  
 
Dedications to Robert McIntosh from his University of Massachusetts [http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=00706100 colleagues] and the [http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=10094&page=206 National Academy of Engineering].
 
Dedications to Robert McIntosh from his University of Massachusetts [http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=00706100 colleagues] and the [http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=10094&page=206 National Academy of Engineering].
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Revision as of 18:51, 19 November 2013

Robert E. McIntosh

Robert E. McIntosh was a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Massachusetts and an IEEE Life Fellow.

McIntosh was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1940 and received a B.S. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, a master’s degree from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Iowa.

In addition to his thirty-one year teaching career at UMass, he played a prominent leadership role in two IEEE societies: the Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and the Antennas and Propagation Society. He also made numerous contributions to the study of microwave technology, particular its uses for the remote sensing of the environment. His laboratory created techniques for understanding complicated geological processes, from the movement of waves to the strength of the wind. He helped to create the Microwave and Electronics Group at the University of Massachusetts’ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and supervised hundreds of students and twenty dissertations.

Further Reading:

Dedications to Robert McIntosh from his University of Massachusetts colleagues and the National Academy of Engineering.