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Oral-History:Westinghouse Electronic Systems

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Revision as of 16:12, 18 February 2011

Westinghouse Electronic Systems Oral History Project

In 2009-2010 The IEEE History Center undertook a joint project with the National Electronics Museum of Linthicum, Maryland to use oral history to document the history of the Westinghouse Electronic Systems Division of Baltimore, Maryland.  Westinghouse Electronic Systems provided research, development, and manufacture of a range of electronic equipment for the United States Armed Forces and other U.S. government agencies from 1938 until it was sold to the Northrop-Grumman Corporation in 1996. Northrop-Grumman continues to operate the division  today.

Among the products developed by Westinghouse Electronic Systems were a wide range of radar systems, air traffic control systems, airborne warning and control systems (AWACS) and the lunar Apollo-TV system.

The Westinghouse engineers interviewed for this project include:

Robert Dwight

Gene Strull

Wayne Fegely

Ben Vester

William Jones

Walter Ewanus

Gwen Hays

Ted Foster

John Gregory

Herb Nunnally

Naomi McAfee

Robert Baim

William Smanko

Kenneth Plante

Charles Denton

Lou Meren

William Gretsch

John Nieberding

Mel Hotz

John Staehlin