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Oral-History:Robert Mumma

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(New page: == About Robert Mumma<br> == Robert Mumma was born July 28th, 1905 in Manila, Philippine Islands to missionary parents, returning to America in 1914. Mumma became interested in radio when...)
 
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== About Robert Mumma<br> ==
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== About Robert Mumma<br> ==
  
Robert Mumma was born July 28th, 1905 in Manila, Philippine Islands to missionary parents, returning to America in 1914. Mumma became interested in radio when it first came out, and attended the electrical engineering program at Purdue for two years (1922-24), before deciding to leave and become a teacher. He received his teaching certificate from Otterbein College in Ohio, and taught high school in both Florida and Ohio. He returned to work in the electronics field, however, after he received a tutorial from the head of the electrical engineering department at Miami University of Ohio in high frequency AC theory, and he got a position at General Motors Radio, where he worked in Joe Desch’s department making test equipment. After that company folded, Mumma then worked for police radio in Dayton, Frigidaire, and finally NCR, where he worked under Desch in the Electrical Research Department. He was involved in many projects there, including developing an electronic counter using gas thyratrons, tube design, standardizing magnetic printing on bank checks, magnetic tape, and he sat on a committee that standardized characters. Mumma was also involved in the war effort at NCR, both under the NDRC and later the Navy which put the whole department onto the Ultra project in 1942.
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Robert Mumma was born July 28th, 1905 in Manila, Philippine Islands to missionary parents, returning to America in 1914. Mumma became interested in radio when it first came out, and attended the electrical engineering program at Purdue for two years (1922-24), before deciding to leave and become a teacher. He received his teaching certificate from Otterbein College in Ohio, and taught high school in both Florida and Ohio. He returned to work in the electronics field, however, after he received a tutorial from the head of the electrical engineering department at Miami University of Ohio in high frequency AC theory, and he got a position at General Motors Radio, where he worked in Joe Desch’s department making test equipment. After that company folded, Mumma then worked for police radio in Dayton, Frigidaire, and finally NCR, where he worked under Desch in the Electrical Research Department. He was involved in many projects there, including developing an electronic counter using gas thyratrons, tube design, standardizing magnetic printing on bank checks, magnetic tape, and he sat on a committee that standardized characters. Mumma was also involved in the war effort at NCR, both under the NDRC and later the Navy which put the whole department onto the Ultra project in 1942.  
  
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Mumma talks about the automation trend that occurred at Frigidaire, and the resistance to the trend at the NCR factory. He also discusses the Ultra project, including the problems with Bombe design, security clearance, the Navy’s involvement in production, and working with Alan Turing. Joe Desch is threaded throughout the interview, with topics including his many patents and designs, his management style, his friendship with Mumma and his breakdown in the 40s all covered.<br>
  
Mumma talks about the automation trend that occurred at Frigidaire, and the resistance to the trend at the NCR factory. He also discusses the Ultra project, including the problems with Bombe design, security clearance, the Navy’s involvement in production, and working with Alan Turing. Joe Desch is threaded throughout the interview, with topics including his many patents and designs, his management style, his friendship with Mumma and his breakdown in the 40s all covered.<br>
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== About the Interview ==
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ROBERT MUMMA: An Interview Conducted by Rik Nebeker, IEEE History Center, 15 September 1995
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<br>Interview # 274 for the IEEE History Center, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
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== Copyright Statement ==
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This manuscript is being made available for research purposes only. All literary rights in the manuscript, including the right to publish, are reserved to the IEEE History Center. No part of the manuscript may be quoted for publication without the written permission of the Director of IEEE History Center.<br>
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Request for permission to quote for publication should be addressed to the IEEE History Center Oral History Program, Rutgers - the State University, 39 Union Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8538 USA. It should include identification of the specific passages to be quoted, anticipated use of the passages, and identification of the user. <br>
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It is recommended that this oral history be cited as follows:<br>Robert Mumma, an oral history conducted in 1995 by Rik Nebeker, IEEE History Center, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.<br>
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== Interview ==
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Interview: Robert Mumma<br>Interviewer: Rik Nebeker<br>Location: Lebanon, Ohio (Mumma’s home)<br>Date: 15 September 1995<br><br>

Revision as of 19:03, 12 February 2009

Contents

About Robert Mumma

Robert Mumma was born July 28th, 1905 in Manila, Philippine Islands to missionary parents, returning to America in 1914. Mumma became interested in radio when it first came out, and attended the electrical engineering program at Purdue for two years (1922-24), before deciding to leave and become a teacher. He received his teaching certificate from Otterbein College in Ohio, and taught high school in both Florida and Ohio. He returned to work in the electronics field, however, after he received a tutorial from the head of the electrical engineering department at Miami University of Ohio in high frequency AC theory, and he got a position at General Motors Radio, where he worked in Joe Desch’s department making test equipment. After that company folded, Mumma then worked for police radio in Dayton, Frigidaire, and finally NCR, where he worked under Desch in the Electrical Research Department. He was involved in many projects there, including developing an electronic counter using gas thyratrons, tube design, standardizing magnetic printing on bank checks, magnetic tape, and he sat on a committee that standardized characters. Mumma was also involved in the war effort at NCR, both under the NDRC and later the Navy which put the whole department onto the Ultra project in 1942.


Mumma talks about the automation trend that occurred at Frigidaire, and the resistance to the trend at the NCR factory. He also discusses the Ultra project, including the problems with Bombe design, security clearance, the Navy’s involvement in production, and working with Alan Turing. Joe Desch is threaded throughout the interview, with topics including his many patents and designs, his management style, his friendship with Mumma and his breakdown in the 40s all covered.


About the Interview

ROBERT MUMMA: An Interview Conducted by Rik Nebeker, IEEE History Center, 15 September 1995


Interview # 274 for the IEEE History Center, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey




Copyright Statement

This manuscript is being made available for research purposes only. All literary rights in the manuscript, including the right to publish, are reserved to the IEEE History Center. No part of the manuscript may be quoted for publication without the written permission of the Director of IEEE History Center.


Request for permission to quote for publication should be addressed to the IEEE History Center Oral History Program, Rutgers - the State University, 39 Union Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8538 USA. It should include identification of the specific passages to be quoted, anticipated use of the passages, and identification of the user.


It is recommended that this oral history be cited as follows:
Robert Mumma, an oral history conducted in 1995 by Rik Nebeker, IEEE History Center, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.

Interview

Interview: Robert Mumma
Interviewer: Rik Nebeker
Location: Lebanon, Ohio (Mumma’s home)
Date: 15 September 1995