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Milestone-Proposal:LORAN

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Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. L.M. Harding|a6=engineering for 99% reliability & maintenance issues
 
Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. L.M. Harding|a6=engineering for 99% reliability & maintenance issues
 
Quote Pierce  
 
Quote Pierce  
 
 
Having to locate loran transmitters (North Atlantic Chain) in remote wilderness areas was a big problem. Getting supplies to isolated stations, crews, MIT  
 
Having to locate loran transmitters (North Atlantic Chain) in remote wilderness areas was a big problem. Getting supplies to isolated stations, crews, MIT  
 
Cooperation with foreign countries was required to build stations in Labrador, Newfoundland, Greenland and Iceland.  
 
Cooperation with foreign countries was required to build stations in Labrador, Newfoundland, Greenland and Iceland.  
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The experiments that had been in progress for some time in the Laboratory to develop an automatic synchronizer seemed also to begin bearing fruit as about this time one was developed which did not deviate nor lose control through high noise levels including electrical storms. Four of these units were being built by the laboratory and by July so confident were they of the worth of the auto-sync that the Laboratory placed an order for sixty of these units based on their prototype to be delivered around the end of 1943.|a7=Its important to note at this time that the work on the radio navigation project referred to as Project #3 or (Project C)  undertaken by MIT did not take place at the famous "Radiation Laboratory" which remains the place where radar / microwave was born. Instead, the engineering team assigned to work on radio navigation moved into the Hood Building in Cambridge, close to but outside the MIT campus.  
 
The experiments that had been in progress for some time in the Laboratory to develop an automatic synchronizer seemed also to begin bearing fruit as about this time one was developed which did not deviate nor lose control through high noise levels including electrical storms. Four of these units were being built by the laboratory and by July so confident were they of the worth of the auto-sync that the Laboratory placed an order for sixty of these units based on their prototype to be delivered around the end of 1943.|a7=Its important to note at this time that the work on the radio navigation project referred to as Project #3 or (Project C)  undertaken by MIT did not take place at the famous "Radiation Laboratory" which remains the place where radar / microwave was born. Instead, the engineering team assigned to work on radio navigation moved into the Hood Building in Cambridge, close to but outside the MIT campus.  
 
 
The proposed milestone plaque could be mounted on MIT Building N42, on Massachusetts Avenue, close to where the original Hood Building used to be. The Boston Section Milestone Committee is currently seeking approval from MIT to carry this out
 
The proposed milestone plaque could be mounted on MIT Building N42, on Massachusetts Avenue, close to where the original Hood Building used to be. The Boston Section Milestone Committee is currently seeking approval from MIT to carry this out
 
Boston Section Milestone History  Committee is currently seeking approval from MIT to carry this out.
 
Boston Section Milestone History  Committee is currently seeking approval from MIT to carry this out.
  
 
LORAN operators were trained somewhere in Boston. Transmitters and receivers were fabricated by large manufacturers located elsewhere.|a8=No|a9=The proposed plaque would be be wall-mounted outdoors,  probably attached to  MIT Building N42, alongside other plaques at 211 Massachusetts Avenue.  The plaque would be readily visible to pedestrians walking on this public sidewalk. The Boston Section Milestone Committee is currently seeking approval from MIT to carry this out|a10=MIT|a11=No|a12=The Boston Section with support from local  Society Chapters, and financial contributions from sponsors.|a13name=Bruce Hecht|a13section=Boston|a13position=2010 Chair|a13email=Bruce Hecht|a14name=Robert Alongi|a14ou=Boston Section|a14position=Section Business Manager|a14email=sec.boston@ieee.org|a15Aname=Gilmore Cooke|a15Aemail=gilcooke@ieee.org|a15Aname2=|a15Aemail2=|a15Bname=c/o Robert Alongi|a15Bemail=sec.boston@ieee.org|a15Bname2=To be assigned later|a15Bemail2=|a15Cname=Gilmore Cooke|a15Ctitle=retired PE|a15Corg=Boston Section Executive Committee|a15Caddress=8 Canvasback, W. Yarmouth, MA 02673|a15Cphone=617-759-4271|a15Cemail=gilcooke@ieee.org}}<br />[[Media:Pierce Loran.pdf|Pierce Loran.pdf]]
 
LORAN operators were trained somewhere in Boston. Transmitters and receivers were fabricated by large manufacturers located elsewhere.|a8=No|a9=The proposed plaque would be be wall-mounted outdoors,  probably attached to  MIT Building N42, alongside other plaques at 211 Massachusetts Avenue.  The plaque would be readily visible to pedestrians walking on this public sidewalk. The Boston Section Milestone Committee is currently seeking approval from MIT to carry this out|a10=MIT|a11=No|a12=The Boston Section with support from local  Society Chapters, and financial contributions from sponsors.|a13name=Bruce Hecht|a13section=Boston|a13position=2010 Chair|a13email=Bruce Hecht|a14name=Robert Alongi|a14ou=Boston Section|a14position=Section Business Manager|a14email=sec.boston@ieee.org|a15Aname=Gilmore Cooke|a15Aemail=gilcooke@ieee.org|a15Aname2=|a15Aemail2=|a15Bname=c/o Robert Alongi|a15Bemail=sec.boston@ieee.org|a15Bname2=To be assigned later|a15Bemail2=|a15Cname=Gilmore Cooke|a15Ctitle=retired PE|a15Corg=Boston Section Executive Committee|a15Caddress=8 Canvasback, W. Yarmouth, MA 02673|a15Cphone=617-759-4271|a15Cemail=gilcooke@ieee.org}}<br />[[Media:Pierce Loran.pdf|Pierce Loran.pdf]]

Revision as of 23:29, 9 December 2010

This Proposal has not been submitted and may only be edited by the original author.
Pierce Loran.pdf