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Gregory E. Stillman

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== Biography  ==
 
== Biography  ==
  
Gregory E. Stillman was the co-recipient of the 1990 IEEE Jack A. Morton Award. He and Charles M. Wolfe won the award "For the growth and characterization of ultra-high purity gallium arsenide and related compounds." He was well-known for his expertise in III-V compound semiconductor materials and devices.
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Gregory E. Stillman was the co-recipient of the 1990 [[IEEE Jack A. Morton Award|IEEE Jack A. Morton Award]]. He and [[Charles M. Wolfe|Charles M. Wolfe]] won the award "For the growth and characterization of ultra-high purity gallium arsenide and related compounds." He was well-known for his expertise in III-V compound [[Semiconductors|semiconductor materials and devices]].
  
 
Dr. Stillman was born in Scotia, Nebraska in 1936. He attended the University of Nebraska, where he earned his Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering in 1958. After graduation, joined the U.S. Air Force, where he served as an officer and a pilot until 1963. Dr. Stillman began his graduate program at the University of Illinois, and earned his Master's and Doctoral degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1965 and 1967, respectively. He then joined the Lincoln Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and remained there until 1975. Dr. Stillman joined the faculty of the Electrical Engineering department at the University of Illinois in 1975. The techniques that he developed to evaluate compound semiconductors are used universally.
 
Dr. Stillman was born in Scotia, Nebraska in 1936. He attended the University of Nebraska, where he earned his Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering in 1958. After graduation, joined the U.S. Air Force, where he served as an officer and a pilot until 1963. Dr. Stillman began his graduate program at the University of Illinois, and earned his Master's and Doctoral degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1965 and 1967, respectively. He then joined the Lincoln Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and remained there until 1975. Dr. Stillman joined the faculty of the Electrical Engineering department at the University of Illinois in 1975. The techniques that he developed to evaluate compound semiconductors are used universally.
  
In 1977, Dr. Stillman was elected a Fellow of the IEEE. In 1985, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Stillman won numerous awards throughout his career including the GaAs Symposium Heinrich Welker Medal (1990), The University of Illinois College of Engineering D.C. Drucker Eminent Faculty Award, and the Faculty Outstanding Teaching Award. In addition to his various awards, Dr. Stillman held several professional memberships. He was a lifetime member of the University of Illinois Center for Advanced Study, an elected member (and subsequent Vice President and President) of the IEEE Electron Device Society (1980-1985), and served as the Chairman of the IEEE Device Research Conference (1988), among numerous other professional memberships and elected positions.
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In 1977, Dr. Stillman was elected a [[IEEE Fellow Grade History|Fellow of the IEEE]]. In 1985, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Stillman won numerous awards throughout his career including the GaAs Symposium Heinrich Welker Medal (1990), The University of Illinois College of Engineering D.C. Drucker Eminent Faculty Award, and the Faculty Outstanding Teaching Award. In addition to his various awards, Dr. Stillman held several professional memberships. He was a lifetime member of the University of Illinois Center for Advanced Study, an elected member (and subsequent Vice President and President) of the [[IEEE Electron Devices Society History|IEEE Electron Device Society]] (1980-1985), and served as the Chairman of the IEEE Device Research Conference (1988), among numerous other professional memberships and elected positions.
  
 
Dr. Stillman died in 1999.
 
Dr. Stillman died in 1999.
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[[Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&_systems]]
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[[Category:Electron_devices]]
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[[Category:Semiconductor_devices]]

Revision as of 14:50, 6 March 2014

Biography

Gregory E. Stillman was the co-recipient of the 1990 IEEE Jack A. Morton Award. He and Charles M. Wolfe won the award "For the growth and characterization of ultra-high purity gallium arsenide and related compounds." He was well-known for his expertise in III-V compound semiconductor materials and devices.

Dr. Stillman was born in Scotia, Nebraska in 1936. He attended the University of Nebraska, where he earned his Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering in 1958. After graduation, joined the U.S. Air Force, where he served as an officer and a pilot until 1963. Dr. Stillman began his graduate program at the University of Illinois, and earned his Master's and Doctoral degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1965 and 1967, respectively. He then joined the Lincoln Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and remained there until 1975. Dr. Stillman joined the faculty of the Electrical Engineering department at the University of Illinois in 1975. The techniques that he developed to evaluate compound semiconductors are used universally.

In 1977, Dr. Stillman was elected a Fellow of the IEEE. In 1985, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Stillman won numerous awards throughout his career including the GaAs Symposium Heinrich Welker Medal (1990), The University of Illinois College of Engineering D.C. Drucker Eminent Faculty Award, and the Faculty Outstanding Teaching Award. In addition to his various awards, Dr. Stillman held several professional memberships. He was a lifetime member of the University of Illinois Center for Advanced Study, an elected member (and subsequent Vice President and President) of the IEEE Electron Device Society (1980-1985), and served as the Chairman of the IEEE Device Research Conference (1988), among numerous other professional memberships and elected positions.

Dr. Stillman died in 1999.