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Beam Lead Technology

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== Beam Lead Technology  ==
 
== Beam Lead Technology  ==
  
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<br>Beam Lead Technology is the name given to the structure and method of micro-fabricating a semiconductor device structure. Its original application was to high-frequency silicon switching transistors and ultra-high-speed integrated circuits.<span style="">&nbsp; </span> <span>In the early 1960's Lepselter<sup>1, 2</sup><span style="">&nbsp; </span>developed the <span style="">&nbsp;</span>techniques for fabricating a structure consisting of electroforming an array of thick, self-supporting gold patterns on a thin film Ti-Pt Au base, hence the name "beams", deposited on the surface of a silicon wafer . The excess semiconductor from under the beams was removed, thereby separating the individual devices and leaving them with self-supporting beam leads or internal chiplets cantilevered beyond the semiconductor. The contacts served as electrical leads in addition to also serving the purpose of structural support for the devices. </span>  
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<![endif]--> Beam Lead Technology is the name given to the structure and method of micro-fabricating a semiconductor device structure. Its original application was to high-frequency silicon switching transistors and ultra-high-speed integrated circuits.<span style="">&nbsp; </span> <span>In the early 1960's Lepselter<sup>1, 2</sup><span style="">&nbsp; </span>developed the <span style="">&nbsp;</span>techniques for fabricating a structure consisting of electroforming an array of thick, self-supporting gold patterns on a thin film Ti-Pt Au base, hence the name "beams", deposited on the surface of a silicon wafer . The excess semiconductor from under the beams was removed, thereby separating the individual devices and leaving them with self-supporting beam leads or internal chiplets cantilevered beyond the semiconductor. The contacts served as electrical leads in addition to also serving the purpose of structural support for the devices. </span>
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<span></span><span>[BSTJ_Beam_Lead_Technology.pdf‎]</span>[[Image:BSTJ Beam Lead Technology.pdf|center|BSTJ article]][original IEEE paper.pdf][[Image:Original_IEEE_paper-1965.PDF]]<br>  
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<span></span><span>[BSTJ_Beam_Lead_Technology.pdf‎]</span>[[Image:BSTJ Beam Lead Technology.pdf|center|BSTJ article]][original IEEE paper.pdf][[Image:Original IEEE paper-1965.PDF|Image:Original_IEEE_paper-1965.PDF]]<br>
  
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[[Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&_systems|Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&amp;_systems]] [[Category:Integrated_circuits]]
 
[[Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&_systems|Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&amp;_systems]] [[Category:Integrated_circuits]]

Revision as of 18:29, 5 April 2009

Beam Lead Technology


Beam Lead Technology is the name given to the structure and method of micro-fabricating a semiconductor device structure. Its original application was to high-frequency silicon switching transistors and ultra-high-speed integrated circuits.  In the early 1960's Lepselter1, 2  developed the  techniques for fabricating a structure consisting of electroforming an array of thick, self-supporting gold patterns on a thin film Ti-Pt Au base, hence the name "beams", deposited on the surface of a silicon wafer . The excess semiconductor from under the beams was removed, thereby separating the individual devices and leaving them with self-supporting beam leads or internal chiplets cantilevered beyond the semiconductor. The contacts served as electrical leads in addition to also serving the purpose of structural support for the devices.

[BSTJ_Beam_Lead_Technology.pdf‎]File:BSTJ Beam Lead Technology.pdf[original IEEE paper.pdf]File:Original IEEE paper-1965.PDF