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Arthur Henry Kehoe

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(Created page with "== Biography: Arthur Henry Kehoe == Arthur Henry Kehoe was born in Bennington, VT, on February 18, 1889, and was graduated from the University of Vermont with the degree of bac...")
 
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== Biography: Arthur Henry Kehoe  ==
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== Biography ==
  
 
Arthur Henry Kehoe was born in Bennington, VT, on February 18, 1889, and was graduated from the University of Vermont with the degree of bachelor of science in electrical engineering in 1911. He spent his career in the employ of the Consolidated Edison System Companies since 1911 when he entered the meter department of the United Electric Light and Power Company of New York.  From 1914 to 1919 he was distribution engineer and then became superintendent of the transmission and distribution department.  In 1921 he was made electric engineer and in 1932 was appointed vice president of the company.  He also served as a member of the board of directors of the New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company, the New York Steam Corporation, and the Consolidated Telegraph and Electrical Subway Company.   
 
Arthur Henry Kehoe was born in Bennington, VT, on February 18, 1889, and was graduated from the University of Vermont with the degree of bachelor of science in electrical engineering in 1911. He spent his career in the employ of the Consolidated Edison System Companies since 1911 when he entered the meter department of the United Electric Light and Power Company of New York.  From 1914 to 1919 he was distribution engineer and then became superintendent of the transmission and distribution department.  In 1921 he was made electric engineer and in 1932 was appointed vice president of the company.  He also served as a member of the board of directors of the New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company, the New York Steam Corporation, and the Consolidated Telegraph and Electrical Subway Company.   
  
 
Mr. Kehoe served as president of the Edison Electric Institute from 1933 to 1939 and president of the New York Electrical Society from 1936 to 1938 and was a member of the board of the National Fire Protection Association. In 1943 he was awarded the [[IEEE Lamme Medal|Lamme Medal]] of the [[AIEE History 1884-1963|American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE, now IEEE)]] "for pioneer work on the development of the alternating-current networks and associated apparatus for power distribution."
 
Mr. Kehoe served as president of the Edison Electric Institute from 1933 to 1939 and president of the New York Electrical Society from 1936 to 1938 and was a member of the board of the National Fire Protection Association. In 1943 he was awarded the [[IEEE Lamme Medal|Lamme Medal]] of the [[AIEE History 1884-1963|American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE, now IEEE)]] "for pioneer work on the development of the alternating-current networks and associated apparatus for power distribution."
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[[Category:Power, energy & industry application|Kehoe]] [[Category:Power generation|Kehoe]]

Revision as of 13:16, 30 May 2012

Biography

Arthur Henry Kehoe was born in Bennington, VT, on February 18, 1889, and was graduated from the University of Vermont with the degree of bachelor of science in electrical engineering in 1911. He spent his career in the employ of the Consolidated Edison System Companies since 1911 when he entered the meter department of the United Electric Light and Power Company of New York. From 1914 to 1919 he was distribution engineer and then became superintendent of the transmission and distribution department. In 1921 he was made electric engineer and in 1932 was appointed vice president of the company. He also served as a member of the board of directors of the New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company, the New York Steam Corporation, and the Consolidated Telegraph and Electrical Subway Company.

Mr. Kehoe served as president of the Edison Electric Institute from 1933 to 1939 and president of the New York Electrical Society from 1936 to 1938 and was a member of the board of the National Fire Protection Association. In 1943 he was awarded the Lamme Medal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE, now IEEE) "for pioneer work on the development of the alternating-current networks and associated apparatus for power distribution."