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Archives:Halcyon Days for Audio Engineering: The 1950s

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(New page: == Abstract  == Popular enthusiasm for higher quality sound made the 1950s an exciting time to be an audio engineer. Those concerned with disk recording made improvements associated ...)
 
 
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== Abstract  ==
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== Abstract  ==
  
Popular enthusiasm for higher quality sound made the 1950s an exciting time to be an audio engineer. Those concerned with disk recording made improvements associated with the new LPs and 45s, such as better recording, mastering, and processing techniques and a new lower-force pickup. Though accurate measurement of the features and performance of phonograph systems began in the 1920s, it was not until the mid 1950s that the industry adopted standardized tests of recording characteristics, making it easier for engineers to communicate and for listeners to judge the relative merits of different phonograph sets or components. This article describes the decade's developments.
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Popular enthusiasm for higher quality sound made the 1950s an exciting time to be an audio engineer. Those concerned with disk recording made improvements associated with the new LPs and 45s, such as better recording, mastering, and processing techniques and a new lower-force pickup. Though accurate measurement of the features and performance of [[Phonograph|phonograph]] systems began in the 1920s, it was not until the mid 1950s that the industry adopted standardized tests of recording characteristics, making it easier for engineers to communicate and for listeners to judge the relative merits of different phonograph sets or components. This article describes the decade's developments.  
  
== Citation and Link to Full Article ==
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== Citation and Link to Full Article ==
  
Frederik Nebeker, "Halcyon Days for Audio Engineering: The 1950s," in ''Signal Processing: The Emergence of a Discipline, 1948-1998'' (Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 1998), 29-53. 
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Frederik Nebeker, "Halcyon Days for Audio Engineering: The 1950s," in ''Signal Processing: The Emergence of a Discipline, 1948-1998'' (Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 1998), 29-53.   
  
[[Media:Chapter3_-_Halcyon_Days_for_Audio_Engineerig,_the_1950s.pdf|Media:Nebeker_Signal_1950s.pdf]]
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[[Media:Chapter3_-_Halcyon_Days_for_Audio_Engineerig%2C_the_1950s.pdf|Halcyon Days for Audio Engineering: The 1950s]]  
  
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[[Category:Signals|Signal]] [[Category:Signal processing|Signal]] [[Category:Signal generation & recording|Signal]] [[Category:Audio recording|Signal]] [[Category:Culture and society|Signal]] [[Category:Leisure|Signal]] [[Category:Music|Signal]] [[Category:News|Signal]]
 
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Latest revision as of 19:09, 2 April 2012

Abstract 

Popular enthusiasm for higher quality sound made the 1950s an exciting time to be an audio engineer. Those concerned with disk recording made improvements associated with the new LPs and 45s, such as better recording, mastering, and processing techniques and a new lower-force pickup. Though accurate measurement of the features and performance of phonograph systems began in the 1920s, it was not until the mid 1950s that the industry adopted standardized tests of recording characteristics, making it easier for engineers to communicate and for listeners to judge the relative merits of different phonograph sets or components. This article describes the decade's developments.

Citation and Link to Full Article

Frederik Nebeker, "Halcyon Days for Audio Engineering: The 1950s," in Signal Processing: The Emergence of a Discipline, 1948-1998 (Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 1998), 29-53. 

Halcyon Days for Audio Engineering: The 1950s