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Anantha P. Chandrakasan

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==Biography==
 
==Biography==
  
Anantha P. Chandrakasan’s pioneering work on low-power circuit design methods has helped overcome one of the most important design constraints in developing integrated circuits. Dr. Chandrakasan has published the most comprehensive body of work in the low-power circuit field, enabling reduction in energy storage requirements that constrain chip and device size. In 1994, Dr. Chandrakasan presented a complete low-power chip set for multimedia applications requiring just 5 mW of power, at a time when chips required 100 times that level. A radical concept that is now commonplace, the work resulted in a tablet computer that was the precursor to today’s handheld multimedia devices. He has continued to impact today’s low-power circuit design with key contributions to dynamic voltage scaling, ambient energy scavenging, ultra-low-power analog-to-digital conversion, and micro-power radios.
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Anantha P. Chandrakasan’s pioneering work on low-power circuit design methods has helped overcome one of the most important design constraints in developing [[Integrated Circuits|integrated circuits]]. Dr. Chandrakasan has published the most comprehensive body of work in the low-power circuit field, enabling reduction in energy storage requirements that constrain chip and device size. In 1994, Dr. Chandrakasan presented a complete low-power chip set for multimedia applications requiring just 5 mW of power, at a time when chips required 100 times that level. A radical concept that is now commonplace, the work resulted in a tablet computer that was the precursor to today’s handheld multimedia devices. He has continued to impact today’s low-power circuit design with key contributions to dynamic voltage scaling, ambient energy scavenging, ultra-low-power analog-to-digital conversion, and micro-power radios.
  
An IEEE Fellow, Chandrakasan is the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering and the Department Head of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.
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An [[IEEE Fellow Grade History|IEEE Fellow]], Chandrakasan is the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering and the Department Head of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.
  
[[Category:Solid state circuits|Chandrakasan]] [[Category:CMOS integrated circuits & microprocessors|Chandrakasan]]
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[[Category:Components,_circuits,_devices_&_systems]]
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[[Category:Integrated_circuits]]
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[[Category:CMOS_integrated_circuits_&_microprocessors]]
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[[Category:Solid_state_circuits]]

Revision as of 13:22, 3 September 2013

Biography

Anantha P. Chandrakasan’s pioneering work on low-power circuit design methods has helped overcome one of the most important design constraints in developing integrated circuits. Dr. Chandrakasan has published the most comprehensive body of work in the low-power circuit field, enabling reduction in energy storage requirements that constrain chip and device size. In 1994, Dr. Chandrakasan presented a complete low-power chip set for multimedia applications requiring just 5 mW of power, at a time when chips required 100 times that level. A radical concept that is now commonplace, the work resulted in a tablet computer that was the precursor to today’s handheld multimedia devices. He has continued to impact today’s low-power circuit design with key contributions to dynamic voltage scaling, ambient energy scavenging, ultra-low-power analog-to-digital conversion, and micro-power radios.

An IEEE Fellow, Chandrakasan is the Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering and the Department Head of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.