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Adele Katz Goldstine

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== Adele Katz Goldstine  ==
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== Biography ==
  
 
Adele Katz was born in New York City in 1920. She attended Hunter College and received her masters at the University of Michigan, becoming a mathematician. She married Herman Heine Goldstine – who was involved in the early development of computers – in 1941.  
 
Adele Katz was born in New York City in 1920. She attended Hunter College and received her masters at the University of Michigan, becoming a mathematician. She married Herman Heine Goldstine – who was involved in the early development of computers – in 1941.  
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At the Moore School of Electrical Engineering in Philadelphia, a group known as the [[ENIAC]] girls was programming the first general-purpose electronic computer, which Katz Goldstine joined in 1942. She was the first programmer for [[ENIAC|ENIAC]], as well as writing its documentation and operating manual.  
 
At the Moore School of Electrical Engineering in Philadelphia, a group known as the [[ENIAC]] girls was programming the first general-purpose electronic computer, which Katz Goldstine joined in 1942. She was the first programmer for [[ENIAC|ENIAC]], as well as writing its documentation and operating manual.  
  
Katz Goldstine died in 1964.  
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Katz Goldstine died in 1964.
  
[[Category:Computers_and_information_processing]] [[Category:General_topics_for_engineers]] [[Category:Mathematics]]
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[[Category:Computers and information processing|Katz]] [[Category:Scientific tools and discoveries|Katz]] [[Category:Mathematics|Katz]]
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[[Category:Mathematics]]

Revision as of 14:32, 24 February 2014

Biography

Adele Katz was born in New York City in 1920. She attended Hunter College and received her masters at the University of Michigan, becoming a mathematician. She married Herman Heine Goldstine – who was involved in the early development of computers – in 1941.

At the Moore School of Electrical Engineering in Philadelphia, a group known as the ENIAC girls was programming the first general-purpose electronic computer, which Katz Goldstine joined in 1942. She was the first programmer for ENIAC, as well as writing its documentation and operating manual.

Katz Goldstine died in 1964.